Apple Watch Series 7: Why I’ll wait for my upgrade

One of my resolutions in 2021 was to lose all my post-pregnancy weight. While I’m halfway there thanks to some strict diet changes and more activity, I have an ulterior motive for this goal. The plan was to get a new Apple Watch this year if I succeeded, and I figured it would end up being the Series 7.

My Apple Watch Series 3 faithful as it is, now has a very cracked display. And while Apple continues to support it, installing a new OS on the Series 3 has become a very annoying exercise since it usually never has enough space for updates. This means I have to follow a cycle of wiping the watch clean, then reinstalling the software. A tedious exercise that I was looking forward to ending this year.

Except the Apple Watch Series 7 has left me a bit confused. And I have decided to wait for an upgrade. Here’s my reasoning. While the bigger display is something that might appeal to most users, for someone like me, this has definitely added to my confusion when considering the new watch. Yes, I’ve made peace with a big screen on the iPhone, but a bigger watch ends up looking terrible on my (still) bony and petite hands. If I were to pick and upgrade, I’ll probably go for the 41mm version, given it will be a better fit for my hands.

But the main reason I would hold out on the upgrade is that the Watch Series 7 doesn’t look like much of a jump, especially compared to the Series 6. Despite the redesign and fancier display, it is underwhelming. For starters, reports are indicating that the Apple Watch Series 7 is running the same processor as the previous version, which is the older S6. Apple didn’t talk too much about the performance jump in the new Watch either, the processor wasn’t mentioned, unlike last year.

No Ronaldo, no wins for Juventus after losing at Napoli 2-1

No Cristiano Ronaldo. No wins for Juventus.

The Bianconeri remained winless in Serie A and slumped to their second consecutive defeat since Ronaldo went back to Manchester United after losing at Napoli 2-1 on Saturday.

Napoli center back Kalidou Koulibaly scored five minutes from time after Moise Kean inexplicably headed the ball toward his own goal following a Napoli corner, setting up a tap-in for Koulibaly.

Matteo Politano equalized for Napoli near the hour mark following Álvaro Morata’s opener for Juventus 10 minutes in at Diego Armando Maradona Stadium.

“We need to change the way we play,” Juventus captain Giorgio Chiellini said. “When you have a superstar like Ronaldo you can’t not play for him. … We should be grateful to Cristiano for these years at Juventus but we need to move on.”

Juventus remained with just one point from a 2-2 draw at Udinese in its season opener. With Massimiliano Allegri having returned as Juventus coach after Andrea Pirlo’s unsuccessful tenure last season ended a run of nine straight Italian league titles, Juventus also lost at home to promoted Empoli before the international break.

The loss to Empoli came a day after Ronaldo’s transfer, while this defeat came on the day that Ronaldo scored twice in his first match and win for United in 12 years in the English Premier League.

“We put in a worse performance against Empoli but today unfortunately we paid the price for errors,” Allegri said. “In soccer, when you don’t win, you can only shut up and work hard.”

Juventus doesn’t have much time to train, though, before traveling to Sweden for its Champions League opener against Malmö on Tuesday.

Napoli, meanwhile, has won all three of its matches under new coach Luciano Spalletti and moved three points clear of Lazio, Inter Milan, Roma, AC Milan and Fiorentina, which won at Atalanta 2-1.

“I’ve got to thank Spalletti for making the team solid,” Napoli president Aurelio De Laurentiis said of the former Roma, Zenit St. Petersburg and Inter coach. “I chose Spalletti because he’s diligent, orderly and handles things firmly, just the way I like it. You can talk to him and he doesn’t get offended if you ask for an explanation, because he isn’t haunted by his ego.”

The equalizer came when Juventus goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny didn’t do enough to control a long-range curled effort from Lorenzo Insigne and Politano slotted it in from near the ‘keeper’s left post.

Morata’s goal came following a defensive error from Kostas Manolas, who was attempting an ill-advised pass back to goalkeeper David Ospina. Morata took possession instead and beat Ospina from a sharp angle.

United States midfielder Weston McKennie played the opening 72 minutes for Juventus despite being banned from a pair of U.S. World Cup qualifiers for violating the national team’s COVID-19 protocols.

McKennis also missed Juventus’ derby against Torino in April after violating COVID-19 protocols in Italy.

Allegri needed McKennie’s services after deciding not to use South American players Paulo Dybala, Juan Cuadrado, Rodrigo Bentancur, Danilo and Alex Sandro because they had just returned from international duty.

ATALANTA STRUGGLES

Dušan Vlahovic converted two penalties for Fiorentina in a 2-1 win at Atalanta, which was expected to contend for the title but has only one win in three matches.

Duván Zapata pulled one back for Atalanta but Fiorentina goalkeeper Pietro Terracciano saved several potential equalizers.

VENEZIA’S BACK

Venezia earned its first points in Serie A in nearly 20 years after beating Serie B champion Empoli 2-1.

Back in the top division for the first time since 2002, Venezia’s goals came from two newly acquired players: French forward Thomas Henry and Nigerian striker David Okereke.

For new hires, remote work brings challenges, opportunities

Rebekah Ingram’s remote internship has come with a series of unexpected challenges: She lacks a proper office set-up, her mother often calls for her while she works, and her dog barks during video calls.

Her situation will sound familiar to anyone who has worked from home during the coronavirus pandemic. The difference for Ingram is that she, like many other young people who started jobs in the past 18 months, hasn’t spent any time in a traditional office. She speculates that remote work is “way more informal”.

“It’s kind of trippy because…you’re working but you’re in your own environment,” said the 22-year-old, who is interning at Like Minded Females Network, a global tech and entrepreneurship non-profit based in London.

Many 2020 graduates left school and entered a world in turmoil, with limited job prospects. Some lost work opportunities as companies cancelled internships or froze hiring altogether. As restrictions have eased in many places, jobs have become easier to find, but work remains far from normal.

Most of all, many young workers say, they know they’re missing out when their office is the four walls of their bedroom. They wish they had more chances for everyday social interactions with their colleagues, both to build camaraderie and to find mentors.

Sohini Sengupta, 22, had an easy transition to remote work because she was used to doing it at school, but she feels she lacks a sense of community at her job.

“When I started working, I took a look at my workplace’s website and I could see photos of them taking trips together, enjoying themselves at the pool table at the office…something I had no chance to experience,” said Sengupta, who lives in Calcutta, India, and is working as a production trainee at a media outlet based in New Delhi.

Annabel Redgate, 25, a public relations account executive at PR agency TANK in Nottingham, England, began her current job in February. When pandemic-related restrictions began lifting a few months ago, she started to reach out to colleagues to meet for drinks after work. Now TANK has begun a staggered return to the office, and it’s the social atmosphere she’s most looking forward to.

“PR is a very personal industry, so I’m excited for the atmosphere in the office,” she said.

For Maya Goldman, a 23-year old health reporter based in Washington, DC, beginning her career remotely has meant struggling to set boundaries for herself, a process she figures she would have seen modelled by her bosses if she had been working in the office.

It was “hard to figure out … when was appropriate to tell my bosses that I was done for the night, or when I should take lunch, and how long I should take lunch for,” Goldman said.

Many employers are conscious of the need to help new remote workers feel welcome.

At 9 every morning, employees at Trevelino/Keller, a marketing firm in Atlanta, participate in “Spotify at 9”, where they all play the same song and talk about it on Slack. They’ve also held book clubs and watched TED talks virtually.

It’s part of an effort to make sure “while you’re waking up every day in your first career remotely, you feel like you’re part of a company and you’re part of our culture,” said Dean Trevelino, co-founder of the firm.

Liza Streiff, CEO at Knopman Marks Financial Training, a financial education company in New York, recently held a barbecue at her place, the first in-person event for the company since the pandemic.

Many of her employees were meeting in person for the first time. It was two of the youngest workers — an intern and another worker who recently joined full-time following an internship — who told Streiff “how much this meant to them”.

Companies are also helping employees take advantage of mentoring opportunities they may feel they’re missing out on.